Moving With Pets: Best Practices for Low Stress

  1. tips for hiring a moving company

Moving to a new home is, quite simply, stressful. You’re searching for the best way to pack all your delicate knick-knacks, tips for hiring a moving company, ideas for unpacking quickly, and waiting to finally relax in your new place. You’re stressing out packing yet another box, and you happen to look over and see another stressed out face peering up at you: your pet, who has no idea why everything is suddenly topsy-turvy. Follow some of these best practices to make the move a little easier on you AND your furry friends.

Consider new pet regulations in your new home
Around 35.1 million Americans move every year, and over 7.5 million of those Americans move to a new state. When moving out-of-state, read up on the different vaccination, leash, registration, and other relevant laws. New regulations might also be in place for a new apartment building, county, or homeowner’s association.

Organize things with their vet
If you need a closer vet to your new home, be sure to find one ahead of time and have your old vet transfer over your pet’s files. Take the opportunity to ask your vet advice about any concerns you have with your pet on moving day, like anxiety or motion sickness in the car.

Update their tags/microchip
The bolt risk for an animal at a new home is as high as their stress level. Update their tags and microchip info (if they have a chip) right away so that they can easily be returned to you if they happen to slip out past a mover.

Keep their supplies easily accessible during all phases of the move
Having their essential food, toys, bedding, and dishes nearby reassures pets that nothing negative is happening, and keeps feeding and play time convenient in the hectic environment of moving boxes.

One of the under-appreciated tips for hiring a moving company: choose one that is animal-friendly
When you’re planning your whole house move, look for pet-friendly moving services who will delicately handle supplies, heed the warning to keep certain doors closed, or simply be conscious of a stressed animal. Forewarn the movers about need-to-know pet info so everyone is on the same page.

Finally, give your pet time to adjust to their new environment. Don’t let them roam alone around the yard or neighborhood until they have acclimated, and give them support and reassurance (lots of treats!) that the new home is a good thing. You know you’re settled when they finally start to look at home.

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